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Entertainment of Thursday, 10 June 2021

Source: www.mynigeria.com

This is why comedian Okokobioko quit dancing

Novieku Babatunde Adeola (R) speaks to comedian and event MC, Okokobioko (L) play videoNovieku Babatunde Adeola (R) speaks to comedian and event MC, Okokobioko (L)

Nigerian-born Ghanaian comedian and event MC, Nana Osei Bonsu, popularly known as Okokobioko in showbiz has stated unequivocally that he did not like to share the spotlight with others, and for that reason, he did not pay attention to developing his dancing career back in the days.

He stated this in an interview with MyNigeria TV's Novieku Babatunde Adeola.

"The thing is growing up, I didn’t know I will be a comedian. I was funny. I watched the likes of basketmouth and all those people. But I started off as a dancer, funny enough. They were those days where I used to break-dance, I was very good.

"I represented my school, government school, Fester Grammar school for the competition. I think we carried third or something. So I started off as a dancer, I thought I was going to be some global or world dancer, but at some point, I realized that we have so many dancers in the world, and most times what is beautiful about dancing is when you see a group of people dancing.

"It is more beautiful to see a group of people dancing than just one person.
I like to be alone. I don’t like the group thing. I want to shine alone. In as much as I want to bring other people up, I wouldn’t want to do the group thing. It’s not my thing," he said.

Speaking on how he has been able to sustain his career in comedy over the years, he revealed that, he was from a naturally funny home, and for that reason, he always had unlimited jokes for his fans.

"I come from a funny home. My dad is funny, my mum is funny. My mum is from Warri so I think it runs in the blood.”

The star comedian also recounted his humble beginnings back home in Nigeria. According to him, he lived in a rented compound house with many occupants.

“We had thirty-something neighbours and each of them get like five children (have five five) so the compound was like a community. I had loads of friends and neighbours growing up".

Watch the video below:

It starts from 13:10 and ends at 14:33

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